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The Major Importance of "Minor" Elements

User Thread
 31yrs • M •
dannyborkowski is new to Captain Cynic and has less than 15 posts. New members have certain restrictions and must fill in CAPTCHAs to use various parts of the site.
The Major Importance of "Minor" Elements
Hi everyone! One of my favorite topics (besides philosophy) is the intersection of anthropology/race/genetics. To most people in this field, the genetic makeup of Europeans and most population groups on Earth is well known, and often studied.

Most - if not all - Europeans, although primarily "caucasian", usually possess anywhere from about 1% to 5% "non-caucasian" or "non-European" genes. In the East and the North, these are usually Asiatic genes, and in the South, they can be anything from Sub Saharan African, to Arabic.

The same thing usually applies around the World, to a varying degree. Middle Easterners tend to have some minor amount of Asiatic or African genes, East Asians tend to have some minor amount of European genes, and so on and so forth.

Although to most people, 1 to 5% is "irrelevant," let's consider the following idea/theory, for a moment :

Every second of your life is made possible by 100% of your genes. You're not a hybrid car, where you can just shut off the electric part of the engine and run on gas, or vice-versa. Every moment of your life, you live with that 100% of your genes, and without even 1%, you aren't really "you." This idea can be applied to things beyond ancestry. Your computer, your TV, any electronic device or functioning organism, can only really be/exist/function as a "100%" element, right? 99.9% doesn't cut it.

Simply put: without 100% of your parts, you're nothing. You need every "piece of your puzzle."

So, what I'd like everyone to opine on is:

What do you think of this idea? What are the implications, if we choose to accept it as valid?

Should 1% of you be equal to your sense of identity as 99% of you, just because you need that 1% to function, or because that 1% is consistently present? Or should it at least be "elevated" from "seemingly irrelevant" to a more respectable place in your identity/who you are? If so, should Europeans feel more "non-European" because of their minor, non-European elements? Or anybody else feel more identified with "something minor in their genes" for that matter? Should your Great, Great Grandma be more relevant to your identity, if we accept this "1%" notion? Should a small, seemingly worthless chip in a PC or TV be given more credit? How does the relevance of 1% of a society, versus the relevance of 1% of you, measure up?

Thanks!

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The Major Importance of "Minor" Elements
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